Everything you need to know about hot shot trucking

Transcript

Hot Shot Trucking: What You Need to Know

As the economy continues to stabilize and businesses begin to pick up the pace, shippers are increasingly diversifying the modes of transportation they use to move goods. LTL shipping, as a whole, has seen a massive increase in demand recently, as more businesses are relying on smaller, more frequent shipments to improve supply line efficiency. Hot shot trucking companies represent a smaller division within the LTL industry. They specialize in direct, expedited LTL loads that need to get to their destinations as quickly as possible. The increase in demand for LTL shipping has directly impacted the hot shot market, as the increased demand has led to longer transit times for standard less-than-truckload freight. When an LTL load requires expedited, direct shipping, more and more customers are relying on hot shot drivers to get it there.

 

What is Hot Shot Trucking? 

Hot shot trucking handles the same sized loads as standard LTL service, but the process is different. Common LTL carriers will use a hub-and-spoke or consolidation model to pick up LTL freight from a variety of shippers, consolidate the shipments at a transportation hub, then transport them together on trailers from hub to hub until they reach their final destination. On the other hand, hot shot trucking uses smaller vehicles to pick up a single LTL shipment and bring it directly to its final destination. Many hot shot companies are owner-operated, and drivers use various four-wheel drive vehicles, including SUVs, pickup trucks, sprinter vans, and other medium-duty vehicles pulling flatbed trailers to transport the freight. 

Hot shot truck freight can vary widely. Some hot shots only need to be transported a short distance, while others may need to cross state lines or even go cross-country. Hot shot trucking is different from expedited shipping, which usually involves a carrier keeping a selection of vehicles waiting on standby to be able to pick up a job on short notice. Instead of keeping expedited shipping vehicles on standby, hot shot hauling jobs are picked up by various drivers through load boards. Load boards, also known as freight boards or freight load boards, are online marketplaces where owner-operator truckers, shippers, and freight brokers can post and find freight that needs delivery. Because of the wide variety of different LTL-sized loads that may be posted at any time, hot shot truckers usually have experience transporting various cargo types and the necessary equipment to load, transport, and unload many kinds of freight.

How Much Does Hot Shot Trucking Cost?

Hot shot trucking rates vary depending on the job and incorporate many factors. In general, they tend to be more expensive than standard LTL rates, as they are last-minute jobs that must be completed in a tight time window. The specific rate you pay will depend on the driver, the size and type of load, the type of vehicle/equipment necessary to haul your freight, and your geographic area. Hot shot truckers often quote a flat delivery rate based on the job's specific characteristics. While LTL shipping is still the best deal for shippers looking to move small to medium-sized loads, when you need something in a pinch, hot shot trucking can get it there.

Image of trucks lined up in a parking lot

Hot Shot Trucking: What You Need to Know

As the economy continues to stabilize and businesses begin to pick up the pace, shippers are increasingly diversifying the modes of transportation they use to move goods. LTL shipping, as a whole, has seen a massive increase in demand recently, as more businesses are relying on smaller, more frequent shipments to improve supply line efficiency. Hot shot trucking companies represent a smaller division within the LTL industry. They specialize in direct, expedited LTL loads that need to get to their destinations as quickly as possible. The increase in demand for LTL shipping has directly impacted the hot shot market, as the increased demand has led to longer transit times for standard less-than-truckload freight. When an LTL load requires expedited, direct shipping, more and more customers are relying on hot shot drivers to get it there.

 

What is Hot Shot Trucking? 

Hot shot trucking handles the same sized loads as standard LTL service, but the process is different. Common LTL carriers will use a hub-and-spoke or consolidation model to pick up LTL freight from a variety of shippers, consolidate the shipments at a transportation hub, then transport them together on trailers from hub to hub until they reach their final destination. On the other hand, hot shot trucking uses smaller vehicles to pick up a single LTL shipment and bring it directly to its final destination. Many hot shot companies are owner-operated, and drivers use various four-wheel drive vehicles, including SUVs, pickup trucks, sprinter vans, and other medium-duty vehicles pulling flatbed trailers to transport the freight. 

Hot shot truck freight can vary widely. Some hot shots only need to be transported a short distance, while others may need to cross state lines or even go cross-country. Hot shot trucking is different from expedited shipping, which usually involves a carrier keeping a selection of vehicles waiting on standby to be able to pick up a job on short notice. Instead of keeping expedited shipping vehicles on standby, hot shot hauling jobs are picked up by various drivers through load boards. Load boards, also known as freight boards or freight load boards, are online marketplaces where owner-operator truckers, shippers, and freight brokers can post and find freight that needs delivery. Because of the wide variety of different LTL-sized loads that may be posted at any time, hot shot truckers usually have experience transporting various cargo types and the necessary equipment to load, transport, and unload many kinds of freight.

How Much Does Hot Shot Trucking Cost?

Hot shot trucking rates vary depending on the job and incorporate many factors. In general, they tend to be more expensive than standard LTL rates, as they are last-minute jobs that must be completed in a tight time window. The specific rate you pay will depend on the driver, the size and type of load, the type of vehicle/equipment necessary to haul your freight, and your geographic area. Hot shot truckers often quote a flat delivery rate based on the job's specific characteristics. While LTL shipping is still the best deal for shippers looking to move small to medium-sized loads, when you need something in a pinch, hot shot trucking can get it there.

See what Koho has to offer
From LTL to insurance, see what you can do on Koho's platform.
Need Help?
Contact our pros! Koho's experts are available 8am to 8pm ET Monday through Friday.