Why LTL is essential for seasonal shipping and products

Transcript

How LTL Steps Up for Seasonal Shipping Trends

Like many industries, freight shipping in the U.S. is cyclical in nature. As we have four actual seasons a year, freight shipping has its own four shipping seasons that are strongly affected by seasonal climate and activities.

The Quiet Season

Each calendar year begins with a lull in freight shipping activity. From January to March, no major holidays are celebrated and, particularly for people in the northern half of the country, there is less interest in getting out and doing things like eating at restaurants, attending parties, or participating in outdoor activities.

The days are shorter and colder, and most folks are still taking a break after the big holidays and celebrations at the end of the previous year. People are also frequently spending less money during this time, because for many, the holiday season comes with plenty of expenses.

While there are still many shipments being delivered during this time, carriers typically experience their lowest shipping volumes of the year. This is helpful to shippers in a couple of ways. Lower volume tends to mean lower rates, so it’s a good time to ship freight that can arrive well in advance of when it’s needed or can be shipped any time.

It is also a good time to reevaluate shipping and supply chain strategies. Nobody wants to try out a new shipping method or update their logistics processes when things are at their busiest. This slower time when less freight is being shipped offers the best opportunity of the year to experiment.

Produce Season

This is another good example of the interplay between seasonal weather and freight shipping seasons. In the spring, as things in the Northern Hemisphere start warming up, harvests begin and the fresh produce needs to get to markets around the country. This increase in activity generally lasts from April through July.

While produce is the biggest driver of this seasonal uptick, consumers also increase their spending during this time. Not only are they going out more as the weather starts to warm up and the days begin to get longer, they also prepare for their summer activities. They may decide to upgrade their camping gear or get a new grill. Whatever plans they make, there’s usually some things to buy that goes along with them.

All of this results in larger shipment volumes for carriers. This can be challenging for shippers not only in higher rates, but also in simply getting their freight onto a truck for those who didn’t plan in advance. It’s important to use the preceding quiet season to get ready if you want the most control over your shipping schedule.

Peak Season

From August through October, freight shipping volumes reach their highest of the year. Back-to-school shopping brings consumers to stores in droves and retailers are busy not only keeping regular products in stock but also preparing for the surge in shopping that will come with the end of the year.

For shippers, this means it may be difficult to get freight on the road and when it happens, rates will be high. This is also the time that any changes or improvements to supply chains and logistics processes during the slower seasons will be truly tested.

The Holiday Season

Another high-volume season, the holidays bring on a frantic round of consumer activity as they purchase gifts, party supplies, decorations, and food for holiday feasts. Shippers have to rush to fulfill orders before the holidays arrive, creating hard deadlines which, if missed, have the potential to turn swaths of customers away from their products in the future.

How LTL Shipping Can Get the Goods to Consumers

Offering one of the most flexible solutions to get freight where it needs to be, less-than-truckload (LTL) shipping can step up when capacity is limited. It offers just-in-time delivery capabilities that shippers can take advantage of by booking smaller amounts of their freight more frequently instead of waiting to fill an entire truck.

LTL carriers combine freight from multiple customers onto one truck, with each individual customer only paying for the amount of capacity that their freight takes up. This results in better value for shippers who can’t fill up an entire truckload or don’t want to wait until they can. It can also prevent perishable products from going bad while sitting in a storage facility for too long.

The LTL shipping experts at Koho can help you navigate the four seasons of shipping. With Koho, you can instantly get quotes from multiple top carriers so you can choose the best value and the best schedule for your shipments. Go to gokoho.com today for the best LTL prices.

Image of trucks lined up in a parking lot

How LTL Steps Up for Seasonal Shipping Trends

Like many industries, freight shipping in the U.S. is cyclical in nature. As we have four actual seasons a year, freight shipping has its own four shipping seasons that are strongly affected by seasonal climate and activities.

The Quiet Season

Each calendar year begins with a lull in freight shipping activity. From January to March, no major holidays are celebrated and, particularly for people in the northern half of the country, there is less interest in getting out and doing things like eating at restaurants, attending parties, or participating in outdoor activities.

The days are shorter and colder, and most folks are still taking a break after the big holidays and celebrations at the end of the previous year. People are also frequently spending less money during this time, because for many, the holiday season comes with plenty of expenses.

While there are still many shipments being delivered during this time, carriers typically experience their lowest shipping volumes of the year. This is helpful to shippers in a couple of ways. Lower volume tends to mean lower rates, so it’s a good time to ship freight that can arrive well in advance of when it’s needed or can be shipped any time.

It is also a good time to reevaluate shipping and supply chain strategies. Nobody wants to try out a new shipping method or update their logistics processes when things are at their busiest. This slower time when less freight is being shipped offers the best opportunity of the year to experiment.

Produce Season

This is another good example of the interplay between seasonal weather and freight shipping seasons. In the spring, as things in the Northern Hemisphere start warming up, harvests begin and the fresh produce needs to get to markets around the country. This increase in activity generally lasts from April through July.

While produce is the biggest driver of this seasonal uptick, consumers also increase their spending during this time. Not only are they going out more as the weather starts to warm up and the days begin to get longer, they also prepare for their summer activities. They may decide to upgrade their camping gear or get a new grill. Whatever plans they make, there’s usually some things to buy that goes along with them.

All of this results in larger shipment volumes for carriers. This can be challenging for shippers not only in higher rates, but also in simply getting their freight onto a truck for those who didn’t plan in advance. It’s important to use the preceding quiet season to get ready if you want the most control over your shipping schedule.

Peak Season

From August through October, freight shipping volumes reach their highest of the year. Back-to-school shopping brings consumers to stores in droves and retailers are busy not only keeping regular products in stock but also preparing for the surge in shopping that will come with the end of the year.

For shippers, this means it may be difficult to get freight on the road and when it happens, rates will be high. This is also the time that any changes or improvements to supply chains and logistics processes during the slower seasons will be truly tested.

The Holiday Season

Another high-volume season, the holidays bring on a frantic round of consumer activity as they purchase gifts, party supplies, decorations, and food for holiday feasts. Shippers have to rush to fulfill orders before the holidays arrive, creating hard deadlines which, if missed, have the potential to turn swaths of customers away from their products in the future.

How LTL Shipping Can Get the Goods to Consumers

Offering one of the most flexible solutions to get freight where it needs to be, less-than-truckload (LTL) shipping can step up when capacity is limited. It offers just-in-time delivery capabilities that shippers can take advantage of by booking smaller amounts of their freight more frequently instead of waiting to fill an entire truck.

LTL carriers combine freight from multiple customers onto one truck, with each individual customer only paying for the amount of capacity that their freight takes up. This results in better value for shippers who can’t fill up an entire truckload or don’t want to wait until they can. It can also prevent perishable products from going bad while sitting in a storage facility for too long.

The LTL shipping experts at Koho can help you navigate the four seasons of shipping. With Koho, you can instantly get quotes from multiple top carriers so you can choose the best value and the best schedule for your shipments. Go to gokoho.com today for the best LTL prices.

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