Bee: Bee Sheets - 24490

Bee Sheets - 24490

What is Freight Class?

All LTL (less-than-truckload) shipments require a freight code. This code, created by the National Motor Freight and Traffic Association, lets carriers quickly identify qualities of the shipment to help with transportation logistics.
Ship bee sheets accurately by using the information below:
NMFC Code
24490
COMMODITY
Bee Sheets
FREIGHT CLASS
60
Commodity note:
Other than flooring, not bent nor curved, consisting of wood flour or wood particles with resin binder, with surface finish, in packages protecting edges and all surfaces liable to damage. For provisions applicable to flooring, see item 34735. Applies whether or not combined with fiberboard or fiberboard wallboard and only when having an integrally formed or laminated surface finish, and only when in rectangular shapes not further finished than cut or molded to peripheral size.

Subclasses for

Bee Sheets - 24490

NMFC numbers can have a number of subclasses. These are usually based on the density of the shipment.
In this instance, the commodity, bee sheets, is further broken down in the following subclasses:
Subclass Info
Subclass NMFC Code
Freight Class
Subclass Notes
Please note: This is for educational purposes only. Ultimately, the carrier reserves the right to classify the groups.

FAQs

What is freight class code definition?

Created and maintained by a nonprofit membership organization named the National Motor Freight Traffic Association (NMFTA), National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) is a classification system used for interstate, intrastate, and foreign commerce movement of LTL shipments. You can learn more from the experts at Koho on our freight classes pages.

How is the cost of freight determined?

Your freight cost is determined by a number of variables, such as how far your shipment needs to go, the freight class number, whether or not accessorials are needed, as well as fluctuating fuel costs and truck capacity.

Can I always use density to find the right NMFC class?

No. While density is one of the primary factors in determining NMFC freight class, other factors, such as value, are also used in making that determination. Gold bars, for example, are very dense, but they fall into shipping class 500 along with very low-density items because of their high value.