Eggs Dairy Products - 55560

Eggs Dairy Products - 55560

What is Freight Class?

When shipping your products as LTL (less-than-truckload), you have to assign your shipment a freight code. This is a standardized code created by the National Motor Freight and Traffic Association which allows carriers to identify qualities of the shipment and assist with transportation.
Ship eggs dairy products accurately by using the information below:
NMFC Code
55560
COMMODITY
Eggs Dairy Products
FREIGHT CLASS
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FREIGHT CLASS
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Commodity note:
Shelled, Egg Albumen (Whites) or Yolks, not cooked:

Subclasses for

Eggs Dairy Products - 55560

Often, NMFC codes have subclasses. These subclasses generally are based on the density of the shipment.
In this instance, the commodity, eggs dairy products, is further broken down in the following subclasses:

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freight subclasses

Subclass Info

55560-1

55560-2

77.5

77.5

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Desiccated (dry), in boxes or drums or in burlap bags lined with waterproof paper.

Frozen; in metal cans, fiberboard cans or plastic-coated fiberboard inner containers, in boxes; in boxes with waterproof liners; or in fiberboard cans, (a) Fiberboard cans with fiberboard ends must be of three-ply wall construction. Ends must be friction type. Wall must have a combined thickness of board of 0.045 inch and test not less than 275 psi. Contents must not exceed 30 pounds.(b) Fiberboard cans with steel tops and bottoms or with metal bottoms and fiberboard tops, contents not to exceed 50 pounds, constructed as follows: Wall must be three-ply, having a combined thickness of board of 0.042 inch and test not less than 275 psi. Bottoms must be made from 100 pounds basis weight cold reduced tin plate.Cover specifications are as follows:(1) Fiberboard covers must be made from two-ply fiberboard having a combined thickness of 0.036 inch and test not less than 200 psi and must interlock firmly with a steel rim reinforcement on body; OR(2) Metal covers must be made from 100 pounds basis weight cold reduced tin plate and must be firmly crimped to the sidewall.

Desiccated (dry), in boxes or drums or in burlap bags lined with waterproof paper.

Frozen; in metal cans, fiberboard cans or plastic-coated fiberboard inner containers, in boxes; in boxes with waterproof liners; or in fiberboard cans, (a) Fiberboard cans with fiberboard ends must be of three-ply wall construction. Ends must be friction type. Wall must have a combined thickness of board of 0.045 inch and test not less than 275 psi. Contents must not exceed 30 pounds.(b) Fiberboard cans with steel tops and bottoms or with metal bottoms and fiberboard tops, contents not to exceed 50 pounds, constructed as follows: Wall must be three-ply, having a combined thickness of board of 0.042 inch and test not less than 275 psi. Bottoms must be made from 100 pounds basis weight cold reduced tin plate.Cover specifications are as follows:(1) Fiberboard covers must be made from two-ply fiberboard having a combined thickness of 0.036 inch and test not less than 200 psi and must interlock firmly with a steel rim reinforcement on body; OR(2) Metal covers must be made from 100 pounds basis weight cold reduced tin plate and must be firmly crimped to the sidewall.

Subclass NMFC Code
Freight Class
Subclass Notes
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Please note: This is for educational purposes only. Ultimately, the carrier reserves the right to classify the groups.

Related Commodities

FAQs

What is NMFC code?

The National Motor Freight Classification (NMFC) is the freight classification system devised by the National Motor Freight Traffic Association (NMFTA) and is used for all interstate, intrastate, and foreign commercial movement of LTL cargo. NMFC codes provide standardized freight classes to determine the ease of transport of many of the wide variety of commodities that are shipped together in LTL shipments.

What does class mean when shipping?

The class determines the cost of the shipping. The lower the class, the lower the cost.

Can how I pack my shipment affect freight class?

Yes. How your freight is packaged can significantly affect the cost of your shipment. Contact Koho for questions about specific commodities and best packaging practices.