Shipping Reel Cores - 41290

Shipping Reel Cores - 41290

What is Freight Class?

When shipping your products as LTL (less-than-truckload), you need to assign your shipment a freight code. This is a standardized code created by the National Motor Freight and Traffic Association which allows carriers to identify qualities of the shipment and assist with transportation.
Ship shipping reel cores accurately by using the information below:
41290
Shipping Reel Cores
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Commodity note:
Applies whether designed for use as either inner containers or outer shipping containers or carriers:

Subclasses for

Shipping Reel Cores - 41290

Having multiple subclasses is not unusual for NMFC numbers. Subclasses are usually a question of density.
In this instance, the commodity, shipping reel cores, is further broken down in the following subclasses:

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freight subclasses

Subclass Info

41290-1

41290-2

41290-3

41290-4

41290-5

41290-6

125

110

65

100

65

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Steel:

SU, NOI, new

SU, NOI, old, used

In half-sections, nested in nests of ten or more, nests banded

KD, NOI

Wooden, KD flat, on pallets

Steel:

SU, NOI, new

SU, NOI, old, used

In half-sections, nested in nests of ten or more, nests banded

KD, NOI

Wooden, KD flat, on pallets

Subclass NMFC Code
Freight Class
Subclass Notes
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Please note: This is for educational purposes only. Ultimately, the carrier reserves the right to classify the groups.

FAQs

Where can I find freight class code chart?

The National Motor Freight Traffic Association (NMFTA) publishes a list of freight class designations, codes, and subclasses for commonly shipped items (https://classit.nmfta.org/). A subscription fee is required to access this list. You can learn more about freight classes from the experts at Koho for free on our freight classes pages.

What happens when a freight class code is wrong?

It might be tempting to declare that your shipment is a lower freight class than it actually is in order to secure a lower price, however, carriers will re-classify your freight for accuracy and charge you a fee for having to do so.

How do I calculate density?

Multiply the length, width, and height of your shipment, then divide the total weight of your package by that number. If your shipment is 4 feet long, 5 feet wide, and 4 feet tall, you would multiply 4 x 5 x 4 to get 80 cubic feet. If it weighs 800 pounds, you would divide 800 / 80 to get 10 pounds per cubic foot.